When talking about badass tattoos, men often think of intimidating, sometimes morbid tattoo designs in order to project as much masculinity as possible. This includes dragon tattoos, demon tattoos, Japanese samurai tattoos, and other images usually associated with metal bands. If you need inspiration, just look up death metal or black metal album covers on Google. Don’t go for a full copy-paste, though. You might get slapped with legal issues in the future.


Your next consideration should be where you want your tattoo. Is it something you want to show off, easily conceal or reveal, or a more personal project that only you will see? Your body will be your canvas, so it’s important to choose a portion of your anatomy appropriate to your art. Back pieces are exceptionally well suited to larger concepts, which you may want to expand at some future date. If you just want to start small, the bicep or the forearm are ideal for more contained show pieces, discrete emblems that can be worked into “sleeves”—either half or full—at a later time.

Not everyone in society will appreciate a good tattoo and sometimes you might be forced to attend functions where showing off your tattoo might not be appropriate. For the neck, head, face or finger tattoos this can pose a challenge when it comes to concealment, but the sleeve tattoo will enable you to conceal your tattoo if you have to attend gatherings where the crowd is not very tattoo-friendly. The sleeve tattoo in this case becomes an advantage and underneath the shirt, you still get to maintain that symbol that means something to you.


Teenagers are always looking for ways to express themselves. For the 18-and-up crowd, tattoos are a simple and stylish way to break the mold. It’s like being able to carry your favorite piece of art (or a meaningful word/phrase) with you at all times. We’ve found 125 modern forearm tattoos ranging from subtle to eye-catching that are perfect for any teens trying to make a statement or immortalize something they care about.
When talking about badass tattoos, men often think of intimidating, sometimes morbid tattoo designs in order to project as much masculinity as possible. This includes dragon tattoos, demon tattoos, Japanese samurai tattoos, and other images usually associated with metal bands. If you need inspiration, just look up death metal or black metal album covers on Google. Don’t go for a full copy-paste, though. You might get slapped with legal issues in the future.
We have also examined tattoos on mummified remains of some of the ancient pre-Columbian cultures of Peru and Chile, which often replicate the same highly ornate images of stylized animals and a wide variety of symbols found in their textile and pottery designs. One stunning female figurine of the Naszca culture has what appears to be a huge tattoo right around her lower torso, stretching across her abdomen and extending down to her genitalia and, presumably, once again alluding to the regions associated with birth. Then on the mummified remains which have survived, the tattoos were noted on torsos, limbs, hands, the fingers and thumbs, and sometimes facial tattooing was practiced.

The idea to get a tattoo sometimes comes unconsciously and is not well thought through. It happens, that a tattoo comes out not the way you expected it to be or the location is not the best and your boss gives you a hard time instead of a promotion. No matter what the reason, you need to remove a tattoo, the question you face is – how? Here are the modern ways to help men in such situations:
Hamlet says it's common for clients to ask for a few changes here and there after the design is done — but recommends going into the process knowing that you shouldn't micromanage the whole thing. Give your tattoo artist the leeway to be creative and use the artistry that is his or her forte. On that same note, don't be afraid to ask for something different if you don't like it. Hamlet says he works on a design until everyone is happy with it.
Tattoos are said to be addicting. Despite the pain, those who get their first bit of body art are often hungry for more. And as tattoos become an increasingly accepted part of society, these ink enthusiasts are filling half or even the whole of their arms with sprawling designs. Called half sleeve and full sleeve tattoos, respectively, these impressive pieces are the result of many hours of hard work for a tattooist and a lesson in patience and perseverance for a client.
The basic meaning of serendipity is good luck that you were not looking for. This is often found in the form of a love of your life that you were not necessarily looking for. We really love the font on this one which looks like it was custom made by the tattooist. There are tattooists that specialise in script and it’s always a great idea to see their work before you begin.
Getting a tattoo hurts, but the level of pain can vary. It can feel like scratching, burning, stinging, or tingling. Some people feel sharp pains while others may describe the feeling as dull. The amount of pain you feel will depend on your pain threshold and other factors, including where on your body you're getting the tattoo, the size and number of needles being used, and the artist's style (some are quick and some work more slowly, some are more gentle than others).

The basic meaning of serendipity is good luck that you were not looking for. This is often found in the form of a love of your life that you were not necessarily looking for. We really love the font on this one which looks like it was custom made by the tattooist. There are tattooists that specialise in script and it’s always a great idea to see their work before you begin.
Crosses have always been a very popular design to get for both males and females. They are most commonly known to represent people of a Christian faith, but can also just be for it’s aesthetic nature. They’re are also a lot of different variants of the cross and they all have different meanings and origins. Because of how simple a design they are they really can work anywhere on your body.
1. You’ll often see sleeve tattoos that extend all over the body. They can start on the arm and extend across the chest or start on the chest/back and extend down the arm. As you can see below, her piece extends from her arm, all the way across and down her back. The black color dramatizes the art and creates an eery look that is intensified by the pops of red.
This sort of tattoo is quite a commitment. They involve hours of work in the chair, concentrated effort by the artist and lots of money on the part of the canvas. Sleeves have come and gone in popularity but have gained more popularity in recent years as tattoos have gained traction over the years. Once someone chooses to get a sleeve, they often opt to get another sleeve and often continue by getting chest pieces and their backs done.

This tattoo design normally has smaller details that need to be given with serious attention by the tattoo artists. Perfecting these tiny details requires wide knowledge about sleeve style tattooing. This is the reason why it is very important for you to opt for a well-experienced and most reliable tattoo artist in town. Depending on the difficulty of the design, this may require days, weeks, and even months of engraving into the person’s arms. It even requires great creativity on the tattoo artist’s part. On the client’s part, on the other hand, a considerable amount of patience is needed. You need to patiently wait until the tattoo is completely done.
It's very important to protect yourself against infection if you decide to get a tattoo. Make sure the tattoo studio is clean and safe, and that all equipment used is disposable (in the case of needles, ink, gloves) and sterilized (everything else). Call your state, county, or local health department to find out about your state's laws on tattooing, ask for recommendations on licensed tattoo shops, or check for any complaints about a particular studio.
A well-known example is the Nazi practice of forcibly tattooing Nazi concentration camp inmates with identification numbers during The Holocaust as part of the Nazis' identification system, beginning in fall 1941.[16] The Nazis' SS introduced the practice at Auschwitz concentration camp in order to identify the bodies of registered prisoners in the concentration camps. During registration, the Nazis would pierce the outlines of the serial-number digits onto the prisoners' arms. Of the Nazi concentration camps, only Auschwitz put tattoos on inmates.[17] The tattoo was the prisoner's camp number, sometimes with a special symbol added: some Jews had a triangle, and Romani had the letter "Z" (from German Zigeuner for "Gypsy"). In May 1944, the Jewish men received the letters "A" or "B" to indicate particular series of numbers.
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