Newsflash: Tattoos are permanent. I'd be lying if I said I thought long and hard about this before I got all my ink. In fact, it's only luck that the ink I first started getting is still a relevant tattoo idea 10 years later. Yes! Turns out this sign of Venus is will most likely be very relevant, no matter what year it is, as I'm have no plans to ever stop being a feminist or a girl. Of course, I can't say the same for the "ironic" location I chose on my lower back, alternatively known as the tramp stamp. Meh. Can't win 'em all, I guess.
A sleeve tattoo is the best if you want to go through the hours of pinpricking without the risk of inconveniencing sensitive parts of your body. The arm isn’t surrounded by any vital body organs that might be put to risk. As much as today’s methods of tattooing have improved with technology, still having a sleeve tattoo done is considered safer compared to having one done on the eyelids or navel area.
If you talk to a tattoo artist about it, they'll likely be able to advise you on what will and won't look good, based on experience. Unfortunately, some of the trendiest tattoos are the most difficult to keep up over time. "There are two main reasons some tattoos age better than others: the size of the tattoo and long-term sun damage," Jordanne Le Fae, of Jordanne Le Tattoos, tells Bustle. But other little variables, like line-thickness and tattoo color, also end up making a difference.
Getting a tattoo hurts, but the level of pain can vary. It can feel like scratching, burning, stinging, or tingling. Some people feel sharp pains while others may describe the feeling as dull. The amount of pain you feel will depend on your pain threshold and other factors, including where on your body you're getting the tattoo, the size and number of needles being used, and the artist's style (some are quick and some work more slowly, some are more gentle than others).

The terms tattoo sleeve, full sleeve, half sleeve, etc. are generic terms given to tattoo designs covering the arm or leg in a close-knit pattern resembling that of a sleeve. The validity of this term is occasionally brought into question but has gained wider acceptance over the years, especially since the dawn of the internet age. “Full sleeve” is just a tad bit catcher and descriptive than searching the web for “full arm piece tattoos.” Most contemporary artists have accepted the term and regularly use it.


As the name of the tattoo itself contains the word scary. It means that these types of tattoo designs are quite weird in look, but successfully creates a never ending effect on the minds of the other people. These types of tattoos can be interpreted in a thousand of different ways. Most popular among them is the skull design with some roses. This form of tattoo is basically designed to scare other people and sometimes reflect the bad side of your personality.
Tattoo sleeve is becoming a new trend among tattoo lovers, but women have taken over this trend in a huge way. Women have a great opportunity of enhancing the beauty of their bodies with sleeve designs. They make your skin look more attractive and beautiful. Women always love to go for designs that depict flowers as well as colorful ink whereas; men like to have tribal style tattoos and bio-mechanical or dragon tattoo designs. However, regarding color the choice is always up to you.

Card symbols have long been popular symbols to get inked. The ace of spades is usually the most popular one to get but not far behind are the Queens. The queen of clubs symbolises a strong willed and positive person. Tattoos in between the fingers usually need to get redone every few years as they do fade due to the amount of rubbing that occurs there.
Yowza, That Looks Uncomfortable Delicious Food & Drink Tiny Tats Badass in Three Dimensions Minimalist Designs Very Clever Visual Jokes Amazing Geometric Shapes Genius Cover-Up Tattoos Cute Little Symbols with Meaning Clever Puns '90s Pop Culture Breathtaking Watercolor Hyperrealism Adorable Pet Tributes Celebrity Cover-Ups Inspired by Nature Awesome Ambigrams From the Pages of Children's Books Parents & Kids Scar Covers
Yeah, yeah, we know that tattoos are permanent, expensive, and straight-up painful—but with style-savvy celebs like Rihanna, Cara Delevingne, Miley Cyrus and Kylie Jenner regularly seen showing off their cute tats, we’re still totally feigning for some fresh ink. These stars don’t have full sleeves, but instead rock smaller, simpler designs on their skin.
The symbolism of the butterfly is as diverse as the species itself. Often associated with the soul, the butterfly may represent the spiritual realm. It is also a strong symbol of transformation because the butterfly transforms from a caterpillar into a butterfly, becoming something new and beautiful. This can be a powerful tattoo for those who have endured hardship of any kind and have found a new, better life...
Perhaps the main difference between ancient and modern tattoos is that in the contemporary West, a given design’s message is often harder to decipher than those of tattoos rooted in specific cultural traditions. It was easy for fellow Maoris to read meaning in the markings on each other’s faces. But why, oh why, would you plaster your scalp with an picture of a continental breakfast, or ink a puking yellow mouse on your back, as certain bold souls showcased here did? (That’s not to suggest that tattoos have lost their tribal significance. Just look to the tattoos of prison gangs, skinheads, biker clubs, punk rockers, and other subcultures.)
The word tattoo, or tattow in the 18th century, is a loanword from the Samoan word tatau, meaning "to strike".[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of tattoo as "In 18th c. tattaow, tattow. From Polynesian (Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan, etc.) tatau. In Marquesan, tatu." Before the importation of the Polynesian word, the practice of tattooing had been described in the West as painting, scarring or staining.[3]
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