Sleeve tattoos are one of the most popular tattoo designs in the world over, as they look both beautiful and prominent. Like the sleeve of a garment, they cover the area from the shoulder to the wrist, though some designs may be half sleeved or quarter sleeved. These designs combine a large number of smaller designs, which make creating them a difficult and time-consuming task, but the effort is truly worth the while.
Ancient tattooing traditions have also been documented among Papuans and Melanesians, with their use of distinctive obsidian skin piercers. Some archeological sites with these implements are associated with the Austronesian migration into Papua New Guinea and Melanesia. But other sites are older than the Austronesian expansion, being dated to around 1650 to 2000 BCE, suggesting that there was a preexisting tattooing tradition in the region.[37][40]
Before getting a tattoo, make sure you have had all your immunizations (especially hepatitis B and tetanus shots). If you have a medical problem such as heart disease, allergies, diabetes, skin problems like eczema or psoriasis, a weakened immune system, or a bleeding problem, talk to your doctor before getting a tattoo. Also, if you get keloids (an overgrowth of scar tissue) you should probably not get a tattoo.
The most difficult part about getting a tattoo is planning the theme, the motif, and the design. Planing is even more important when it comes to sleeves because they are elaborate works of art that take a long time to draw. You don't want to go through hours of pain and then be unsatisfied with the final result. Work closely with your artist to come up with the exact image and colors.
When it comes down to it, tattoos are a little bit like real estate. The location really matters. "'High Friction Zones' tend to fade super fast," tattooist Adam Villani, tells Bustle. "Think hands, feet, and other areas that come into a lot of contact with friction [...] it really depends on your lifestyle." So think about what sports you do and clothes you wear before you get the tattoo done.
Do not wrap your tattoo again unless the artist says so. It’s highly important to keep the tattoo clean after the protection has been removed. Keep in mind that your new tattoo is similar to an open injury. Plenty of tattoo artists recommend hand-washing the tattoo lightly but thoroughly with your clean fingers, using an unscented and anti-bacterial soap. Let it air dry or pat it gently with a dry and clean paper towel. Everything you use or touch should be clean. It’s also common for a new tattoo to be inflamed, red, or sensitive.
Certain colours - red or similar colours such as purple, pink, and orange - tend to cause more problems and damage compared to other colours.[87] Red ink has even caused skin and flesh damages so severe that the amputation of a leg or an arm has been necessary. If part of a tattoo (especially if red) begins to cause even minor troubles, like becoming itchy or worse, lumpy, then Danish experts strongly suggest to remove the red parts.[88]
The first documented professional tattooist in Britain was Sutherland Macdonald, who operated out of a salon in London beginning in 1894.[50] In Britain, tattooing was still largely associated with sailors[51] and the lower or even criminal class,[52] but by the 1870s had become fashionable among some members of the upper classes, including royalty,[3][53] and in its upmarket form it could be an expensive[54] and sometimes painful[55] process. A marked class division on the acceptability of the practice continued for some time in Britain.[56] Recently, a trend has arisen marketed as 'Stick and Poke' tattooing; primitive figures are permanently inscribed by the user himself after he obtains a 'DIY' kit containing needles, ink and a collection of suggestions.[57]
I get angry with myself. This is nothing but snobbery, I think – latent anxiety about the trappings of class. As if my son had deliberately turned his back on a light Victoria sponge and stuffed his face with cheap doughnuts. I am aware, too, that I associate tattoos on men with aggression, the kind of arrogant swagger that goes with vest tops, dogs on chains, broken beer glasses.
"In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, tattoos were as much about self-expression as they were about having a unique way to identify a sailor's body should he be lost at sea or impressed by the British navy. The best source for early American tattoos is the protection papers issued following a 1796 congressional act to safeguard American seamen from impressment. These proto-passports catalogued tattoos alongside birthmarks, scars, race, and height. Using simple techniques and tools, tattoo artists in the early republic typically worked on board ships using anything available as pigments, even gunpowder and urine. Men marked their arms and hands with initials of themselves and loved ones, significant dates, symbols of the seafaring life, liberty poles, crucifixes, and other symbols."[64]
A growing trend in the US and UK is to place artistic titoos over the surgical scars of a mastectomy. "More women are choosing not to reconstruct after a mastectomy and tattoo over the scar tissue instead.... The mastectomy tattoo will become just another option for post cancer patients and a truly personal way of regaining control over post cancer bodies and proving once and for all that breast cancer is not just a pink ribbon."[27] The tattooing of nipples on reconstructed breasts remains in high demand, however.[28]
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