The one and only thing that a person should keep in mind before getting the tattoo inked is that it requires a great deal of commitment, enough money and time. Don’t’ forget that once you get this tattoo inked it’s hard to get it removed because of its size and prominence. Sleeve tattoos are designed only to increase your style statement. Though the placement of the tattoo is determined on the size and design of the tattoo, but some spots that are favored both by men and women includes arms and legs area.
Because of the variety and versatility, it gives to the designer as well as the bearer, it is a great piece of art for those who want to show off their individuality and originality to the whole world. The one and the only thing to bear in mind before having a sleeve tattoo etched is that it requires a great deal of commitment, as time, money and comfort, all are at stake. And another factor which you should base your decision is that you should be willing to carry such a tattoo with your forever because, once done, such a tattoo is hard to get rid of due to its size and prominence. The lasting nature of this tattoo can make it both, beneficial as well as disadvantaged for the bearer.
For those peeps who freak out at the commitment or thought of getting so inked, then check out this research: A small study at the University of Alabama found that those with multiple tattoos showed a better immune response to new ink than those who were going under the tattoo gun for the first time. This suggests that tattooing might stimulate the immune system, like how a vaccine does. 
Despite all our advances in technology, the basic needling technique used to insert pigment into skin hasn’t changed all that much over time. The biggest change came when the electric tattooing machine was first patented in 1891. That technology has remained relatively stagnant since–aside from prisoners’ ad hoc redesigns, in which a cassette recorder, an electric razor, or electric toothbrush can be used as a motor. These jailed tattooists’ inventions show just what desperate lengths people will go to to turn a boring patch of bare skin into something that better expresses the self underneath.
As with any tattoo, you’ll need to keep your bandages on for a few hours, then Gualteros says to wash the tattoo with antibacterial soap and water, let it air dry for 10 minutes, and put a thin layer of Aquaphor on it after each shower for the first two days. (Then switch to unscented body lotion.) While the tattoo heals, wash it 2-3 times a day until peeling stops. This usually takes one week. Continue with light layers of unscented lotion.
Some people know the subject matter that they’d like to have done, but haven’t figured out what they want it to look like. Use the internet to search for ideas, taking full advantage of great inspiration sites like Google Image or Pinterest to see art others have had done. If you find something you like, but want your own take on it, print it out and save it for your appointment with one of our tattoo artists; they can take a look at your pulled images and design a tattoo that is absolutely unique to you!
"In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, tattoos were as much about self-expression as they were about having a unique way to identify a sailor's body should he be lost at sea or impressed by the British navy. The best source for early American tattoos is the protection papers issued following a 1796 congressional act to safeguard American seamen from impressment. These proto-passports catalogued tattoos alongside birthmarks, scars, race, and height. Using simple techniques and tools, tattoo artists in the early republic typically worked on board ships using anything available as pigments, even gunpowder and urine. Men marked their arms and hands with initials of themselves and loved ones, significant dates, symbols of the seafaring life, liberty poles, crucifixes, and other symbols."[64]
A well-known example is the Nazi practice of forcibly tattooing Nazi concentration camp inmates with identification numbers during The Holocaust as part of the Nazis' identification system, beginning in fall 1941.[16] The Nazis' SS introduced the practice at Auschwitz concentration camp in order to identify the bodies of registered prisoners in the concentration camps. During registration, the Nazis would pierce the outlines of the serial-number digits onto the prisoners' arms. Of the Nazi concentration camps, only Auschwitz put tattoos on inmates.[17] The tattoo was the prisoner's camp number, sometimes with a special symbol added: some Jews had a triangle, and Romani had the letter "Z" (from German Zigeuner for "Gypsy"). In May 1944, the Jewish men received the letters "A" or "B" to indicate particular series of numbers.
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