Yup, you found it. This is the famous “Tattoo Sleeves” 140 greatest of all time” page with the most amazing sleeve tattoos ever. Congrats. You found it!There’s no particular meaning behind tattoo sleeves, they are just awesome and demand a huge amount of creativity to make one that stands out from the rest. They also take a lot of time and effort to make, and quite a lot of endurance for the one who gets it done.
Yes, women's bodies change from the time they're 18 to 40 -- from pregnancy, surgeries and aging. But according to Taylor, female tattoos can be incredibly empowering. "Pick an area you are happy with, and draw attention to it. Or use your new tattoo to disguise an area that you're not happy with," she says. "There are also parts of our bodies that don't change much during our life, and are also easy to hide depending on what you wear, such as wrists, ankles and shoulder blades."
Many tattoos serve as rites of passage, marks of status and rank, symbols of religious and spiritual devotion, decorations for bravery, sexual lures and marks of fertility, pledges of love, amulets and talismans, protection, and as punishment, like the marks of outcasts, slaves and convicts. The symbolism and impact of tattoos varies in different places and cultures. Tattoos may show how a person feels about a relative (commonly mother/father or daughter/son) or about an unrelated person.[13] Today, people choose to be tattooed for artistic, cosmetic, sentimental/memorial, religious, and magical reasons, and to symbolize their belonging to or identification with particular groups, including criminal gangs (see criminal tattoos) or a particular ethnic group or law-abiding subculture. Popular verses include John 3:16, Philippians 4:13, and Psalms 23.[14]
Certain colours - red or similar colours such as purple, pink, and orange - tend to cause more problems and damage compared to other colours.[87] Red ink has even caused skin and flesh damages so severe that the amputation of a leg or an arm has been necessary. If part of a tattoo (especially if red) begins to cause even minor troubles, like becoming itchy or worse, lumpy, then Danish experts strongly suggest to remove the red parts.[88]

The word tattoo, or tattow in the 18th century, is a loanword from the Samoan word tatau, meaning "to strike".[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of tattoo as "In 18th c. tattaow, tattow. From Polynesian (Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan, etc.) tatau. In Marquesan, tatu." Before the importation of the Polynesian word, the practice of tattooing had been described in the West as painting, scarring or staining.[3]
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