Established and up-and-coming artists post photos of their work, and users regularly tag their favorite artists after going under the needle. Instagram isn’t just limited to #ink photos though, with designers frequently posting art and tattoo designs. They also make it easy to save your favorite images into collections How to Privately Save and Collect Instagram Photos Like on Pinterest How to Privately Save and Collect Instagram Photos Like on Pinterest Instagram's latest update introduces the ability to keep saved photos organized with a feature that's remarkably similar to Pinterest. Read More , readily accessible from your profile page.
A recent study in the US surprising revealed that whilst 85% of people think that males are more likely to have tattoos, on the contrary, 59% of the tattooed population is made up of females. We now live in an age where tattoos are common place and it’s not longer considered a faux pas for a female to have tattoos showing. Tattoos are a great way of expressing yourself through body art and we have compiled 125 of our favourite tattoo ideas for girls.

Geometric tattoos are probably one of the most trending designs from the last couple of years. They look great, are timeless and not too expensive. Above is an example of a silver and black one on the forearm, which is a very popular spot for people to get tattoos now that they’re more socially acceptable and not necessarily restricted to areas that you need to cover up anymore.


I LIKE LOVE. Don't you? koomdesign 0 0 Owl catcher artilleryart 2 2 Japanese dragon tattoo SLam98 0 0 Lotus Caduceus SamadhiDesign 0 0 October 8- Come Play With Me KitKatKittyKatKitten 0 0 Horse in the night StellaArt9 1 0 Lotus Tattoo Design twovader 5 0 -mirror of dig. painttattoo- Gold-Angel 5 0 Ocean Lady LucieOn 4 0 Tropical Sauron jhary13 1 0 A wolf StellaArt9 0 0 Owl StellaArt9 0 0 A lady with animal StellaArt9 1 0 Beautiful death jhary13 2 0 Lune artilleryart 0 0 Moon drink artilleryart 1 0 An owl and a girl StellaArt9 1 0 Snake Bulb jhary13 0 0 Color pop jhary13 0 0 Line Cross jhary13 2 0 Medusa jhary13 1 0
Many people start their tattoo sleeves without intent and that's just fine. If you take the organic approach and let one small tattoo turn into another and somehow tie it all together with a background of some sort later, you'll likely have an armful of meaningful body art. Others go full on with a sleeve from the get-go and that works too. Of course, with this approach, you'll be investing a larger sum of money upfront, and you'll need to dedicate the time in the chair to complete the work. Most likely you'll be going back to the same artist which means their schedule will need to be considered as well. If you have the time and the money to complete the job, get it done. Otherwise start a slower and more balanced approach. Never compromise quality for quantity.

When it comes down to it, tattoos are a little bit like real estate. The location really matters. "'High Friction Zones' tend to fade super fast," tattooist Adam Villani, tells Bustle. "Think hands, feet, and other areas that come into a lot of contact with friction [...] it really depends on your lifestyle." So think about what sports you do and clothes you wear before you get the tattoo done.
Ancient tattooing was most widely practiced among the Austronesian people. It was one of the early technologies developed by the Proto-Austronesians in Taiwan and coastal South China prior to at least 1500 BCE, before the Austronesian expansion into the islands of the Indo-Pacific.[36][37] It may have originally been associated with headhunting.[38] Tattooing traditions, including facial tattooing, can be found among all Austronesian subgroups, including Taiwanese Aborigines, Islander Southeast Asians, Micronesians, Polynesians, and the Malagasy people. Austronesians used the characteristic hafted skin-puncturing technique, using a small mallet and a piercing implement made from Citrus thorns, fish bone, bone, and oyster shells.[37][1][39]
81. There’s a lot of variation in this piece which makes it appealing to the casual observer. There’s a keen sense of continuity in the art. The bird has such a vivid appearance that makes it real looking. The attention to it’s detail in every feather is done really well. The way that the branches swerve all around makes it appear less life like but very interesting. The artist brings an added zing with the red flower at the wrist and it’s interesting how the artist implemented the canvas’s skin as part of the backdrop.
I get angry with myself. This is nothing but snobbery, I think – latent anxiety about the trappings of class. As if my son had deliberately turned his back on a light Victoria sponge and stuffed his face with cheap doughnuts. I am aware, too, that I associate tattoos on men with aggression, the kind of arrogant swagger that goes with vest tops, dogs on chains, broken beer glasses.

Many studies have been done of the tattooed population and society's view of tattoos. In June 2006, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology published the results of a telephone survey of 2004. It found that 36% of Americans ages 18–29, 24% of those 30–40, and 15% of those 41–51 had a tattoo.[58] In September 2006, the Pew Research Center conducted a telephone survey that found that 36% of Americans ages 18–25, 40% of those 26–40 and 10% of those 41–64 had a tattoo. They concluded that Generation X and Generation Y express themselves through their appearance, and tattoos are the most popular form of self-expression.[59] In January 2008, a survey conducted online by Harris Interactive estimated that 14% of all adults in the United States have a tattoo, slightly down from 2003, when 16% had a tattoo. Among age groups, 9% of those ages 18–24, 32% of those 25–29, 25% of those 30–39 and 12% of those 40–49 have tattoos, as do 8% of those 50–64. Men are slightly more likely to have a tattoo than women.
Deciding to get a tattoo is a big deal, regardless of whether it's your first time under the needle or not. But for a tattoo virgin, the stakes are arguably even higher when it comes to picking a design and spot that won't be hated later. Classic wrist tattoo ideas are always a great place to start for inspiration, IMO, although what you choose to ink is entirely your decision.
If you want an animal-based tattoo, the most obvious choices include lion tattoos, tiger tattoos, and wolf tattoos. The bigger the design, the better. Eagle tattoos are also excellent choices, especially when done on the upper back with the wings extending all the way to the shoulders. If you want badass animal-based tattoos inspired by different mythologies and religions, Hinduism is an excellent place to look into. There’s Ganesha (elephant), Narasimha (lion), and Garuda (eagle).
Tattooing is regulated in many countries because of the associated health risks to client and practitioner, specifically local infections and virus transmission. Disposable plastic aprons and eye protection can be worn depending on the risk of blood or other secretions splashing into the eyes or clothing of the tattooist. Hand hygiene, assessment of risks and appropriate disposal of all sharp objects and materials contaminated with blood are crucial areas. The tattoo artist must wash his or her hands and must also wash the area that will be tattooed. Gloves must be worn at all times and the wound must be wiped frequently with a wet disposable towel of some kind. All equipment must be sterilized in a certified autoclave before and after every use. It is good practice to provide clients with a printed consent form that outlines risks and complications as well as instructions for after care.[67]

Tattoo sleeves are badass and totally eye-catching -- no one can deny that. Turning an entire arm or leg into a work of art requires some serious commitment and love for ink. In fact, we'd go so far as to argue that our arms or legs are the perfect canvas to be transformed into a piece of art. Our limbs are incredibly easy to hide, but also super easy to show off, arguably making tattoo sleeves the best spot to get inked. 
Tattoos have also been used for identification in other ways. As early as the Zhou, Chinese authorities would employ facial tattoos as a punishment for certain crimes or to mark prisoners or slaves. During the Roman Empire, gladiators and slaves were tattooed: exported slaves were tattooed with the words "tax paid", and it was a common practice to tattoo "Stop me, I'm a runaway" on their foreheads.[18] Owing to the Biblical strictures against the practice,[19] Emperor Constantine I banned tattooing the face around AD 330, and the Second Council of Nicaea banned all body markings as a pagan practice in AD 787.[20]
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