The first place to start is in determining what you believe in and the things you are passionate about. Perhaps you are deeply involved in your religion, animal welfare, or your children. It’s important to consider whether the things you are passionate about today will still hold meaning to you 10, 20 or 30 years down the road. If the answer is yes, you are on the right track. As you can see there are many great tattoo ideas for guys to consider.


If you know you eventually want a sleeve, or if you’re going full-sleeve right out the gate, then Gualteros recommends starting at the shoulder. From there, you’ll work your way down the arm. “If someone came to me and let me do whatever I wanted, I’d start from the top with something that fits the body,” he says. “Something that doesn’t look like a sticker on the arm, then bring it down and fill it in.” Alternatively, he notes that some of his customers and fellow artists prefer to start at the wrist and work their way up, but on the same principle: By starting on one end, you aren’t guessing where to place everything else. Instead, you’re moving up or down the sleeve and filling it in with some kind of order.
Tattoos have recently started to become more prominent than before. There’s not one part of a person’s body that hasn’t been touched by a tattoo. This form of ink art has been placed on pretty much every minor and major areas of the human body. A lot of men like having sleeve tattoos, since they give quite an impressive look, especially when they use a good design and the color combination is excellent. It’s also advisable, and even appropriate at times, to pick a good sleeve tattoo for men, when you compare it to getting inked on other parts of the body.
After it’s done peeling, you can start your long-term care plan: “Always use sunblock and body lotion,” says Gualteros. “Honestly, if a tattoo is properly done and properly taken care of, it should be good for life, without touch up. So long as there’s good foundation—that is, black and line work—it should look good over time.” If you don’t properly block the skin from the sun’s wear, or condition it daily, the colors will fade over time and will require a touching up. Considering you’ll be working with a full sleeve or more, it’s best to get in the habit of using sunblock and lotion.
The first documented professional tattooist in Britain was Sutherland Macdonald, who operated out of a salon in London beginning in 1894.[50] In Britain, tattooing was still largely associated with sailors[51] and the lower or even criminal class,[52] but by the 1870s had become fashionable among some members of the upper classes, including royalty,[3][53] and in its upmarket form it could be an expensive[54] and sometimes painful[55] process. A marked class division on the acceptability of the practice continued for some time in Britain.[56] Recently, a trend has arisen marketed as 'Stick and Poke' tattooing; primitive figures are permanently inscribed by the user himself after he obtains a 'DIY' kit containing needles, ink and a collection of suggestions.[57]
Don’t expect to get a huge tattoo, or series of them, in just one sitting. They just take too long. Gualteros has some clients who fly in from overseas, and who then spend a few solid days getting big-scale tattoos completed. But that’s a special case. “Usually it’ll happen over more time,” he says. “It could take months, it could take years. Usually, you leave 3-4 weeks between appointments and a sleeve can require anywhere from 8-10 sessions.”
The Japanese word irezumi means "insertion of ink" and can mean tattoos using tebori, the traditional Japanese hand method, a Western-style machine or any method of tattooing using insertion of ink. The most common word used for traditional Japanese tattoo designs is horimono.[7] Japanese may use the word tattoo to mean non-Japanese styles of tattooing.
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