Newsflash: Tattoos are permanent. I'd be lying if I said I thought long and hard about this before I got all my ink. In fact, it's only luck that the ink I first started getting is still a relevant tattoo idea 10 years later. Yes! Turns out this sign of Venus is will most likely be very relevant, no matter what year it is, as I'm have no plans to ever stop being a feminist or a girl. Of course, I can't say the same for the "ironic" location I chose on my lower back, alternatively known as the tramp stamp. Meh. Can't win 'em all, I guess.

Many of the inspirations of great numbers of people who are going for these tattoos are famous celebrities. Well, there is no question about that since people tend to do what their idols are doing. They want to look like their celebrity idols, which is why they allowed themselves to get tattooed. In relation to this, here are some of the world-renowned celebrities nowadays who are proudly displaying their tattoos on their arms:
Leave the colors to the artist. Hamlet suggests not bringing in a fully rendered drawing of the image and colors you want. The more I interview tattoo artists, the more I am coming to understand that getting a tattoo is like commissioning an artist to paint a mural. You do own the building, but you don't hand the artist a photo of another artist's mural and tell them to replicate it for you. Instead, you say your building works for peace and you want a mural that conveys that message and that you especially love lily of the valley flowers and the image of the rising sun. Then you let the artist do what they do: Create some art!
It is commonly held that the modern popularity of tattooing stems from Captain James Cook's three voyages to the South Pacific in the late 18th century. Certainly, Cook's voyages and the dissemination of the texts and images from them brought more awareness about tattooing (and, as noted above, imported the word "tattow" into Western languages). On Cook's first voyage in 1768, his science officer and expedition botanist, Sir Joseph Banks, as well as artist Sydney Parkinson and many others of the crew, returned to England with tattoos, although many of these men would have had pre-existing tattoos.[citation needed] Banks was a highly regarded member of the English aristocracy that had acquired his position with Cook by co-financing the expedition with ten thousand pounds, a very large sum at the time. In turn, Cook brought back with him a tattooed Raiatean man, Omai, whom he presented to King George and the English Court. On subsequent voyages other crew members, from officers, such as American John Ledyard, to ordinary seamen, were tattooed.[49]

The word tattoo, or tattow in the 18th century, is a loanword from the Samoan word tatau, meaning "to strike".[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of tattoo as "In 18th c. tattaow, tattow. From Polynesian (Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan, etc.) tatau. In Marquesan, tatu." Before the importation of the Polynesian word, the practice of tattooing had been described in the West as painting, scarring or staining.[3]

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